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Table 2 Correlations among children’s evaluations of risk, safety knowledge, risk-taking behaviors, and continuous demographic variables

From: Chinese preschoolers’ risk-taking behaviors: a tripartite relation

  (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16)
(1) Risk evaluation                
(2) Risk evaluation: falls .88               
(3) Risk evaluation: burns .87 .63              
(4) Risk evaluation: traffic .85 .62 .64             
(5) Safety knowledge .57 .47 .51 .50            
(6) Safety knowledge: falls .44 .37 .35 .41 .70           
(7) Safety knowledge: burns .47 .43 .41 .38 .53 .19          
(8) Safety knowledge: traffic .37 .31. .34 .31 .65 .21 .28         
(9) Risk-taking −  .49 − .44 − .37 − .44 −  .40 − .31 − .13 .33        
(10) Risk-taking: falls − .36 − .37 − .27 − .27 − .27 − .22 − .15 − .23 .73       
(11) Risk-taking: burns − .39 − .35 − .31 − .35 − .35 − .27 − .08 − .29 .87 .44      
(12) Risk-taking: traffic − .41 − .34 − .29 − .42 − .33 − .24 − .12 − .27 .78 .39 .55     
(13) Child’s age .30 .26 .29 .23 .53 .39 .28 .29 − .08 − .12 − .08 − .01    
(14) Father’s age .13 .14 .07 .10 .27 .04 .07 .28 − .10 − .07 −  .14 .03 .21   
(15) Mother’s age .06 .07 .02 .04 .22 .04 − .02 .23 − .08 − .07 − .09 − .02 .18 .81  
(16) Family SES .22 .16 − .27 .20 .42 .15 .13 .32 − .33 − .18 −  .31 − .30 − .02 .11 .16
  1. Italics show (1) the hypothesized relations among children’s evaluations of risky behaviors as dangerous, safety knowledge, and risk-taking behavior; (2) associations between continuous demographic characteristics and the three components of the relational pattern. Family SES is reported as a z score based on combined information on parent education and family annual income
  2. N = 217. Bolded values are significant at the p < .05 level